Isoquant Curve

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DEFINITION of 'Isoquant Curve'

A graph of all possible combinations of inputs that result in the production of a given level of output. Used in the study of microeconomics to measure the influence of inputs on the level of production or output that can be achieved.

Isoquant Curve

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Isoquant Curve'

In Latin, "iso" means equal and "quant" refers to quantity. This translates to "equal quantity". The isoquant curve helps firms to adjust their inputs to maximize output and profits. At some point, the returns of adding another worker or piece of equipment will start to hurt output.

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