DEFINITION of 'Issuer'

A legal entity that develops, registers and sells securities for the purpose of financing its operations. Issuers may be domestic or foreign governments, corporations or investment trusts. Issuers are legally responsible for the obligations of the issue and for reporting financial conditions, material developments and any other operational activities as required by the regulations of their jurisdictions. The most common types of securities issued are common and preferred stocks, bonds, notes, debentures, bills and derivatives.


Say ABC Corp. sells common shares to the general public on the market in order to generate capital to finance its business operations. This means ABC Corp. is an issuer, and it's therefore required to file with regulators, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission, disclosing relevant financial information about the company. ABC must also meet any legal obligations or regulations in the jurisdiction where it issued the security.

Writers of options are occasionally referred to as issuers of options because they also sell securities on a market.

  1. Bond

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    A type of debt instrument that is not secured by physical assets ...
  6. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
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