Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma

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DEFINITION of 'Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma'

A normal prisoner's dilemma played repeatedly by the same participants. An iterated prisoner's dilemma differs from the original concept of a prisoner's dilemma because participants can learn about the behavioral tendencies of their counterparty.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma'

Since the game is repeated, one individual can formulate a strategy that does not follow the regular logical convention of an isolated round.
"Tit for tat" is a common iterated prisoner's dilemma strategy.

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