The Institute Of Chartered Accountants Of Scotland - ICAS

DEFINITION of 'The Institute Of Chartered Accountants Of Scotland - ICAS'

The world's first professional body of financial bookkeepers. The ICAS received its royal charter in 1854, and was the first to adopt the designation "Chartered Accountant" and the designatory letters, CA. The ICAS had 18,278 members in 2009.

BREAKING DOWN 'The Institute Of Chartered Accountants Of Scotland - ICAS'

The ICAS has played a leading role in the development of the accountancy profession since its formation. It has offices in Edinburgh, Glasgow and London. The objectives of the ICAS include are to develop business leaders of tomorrow, promote the distinctive CA brand, lead professional change, offer lifelong relevance for its members and deliver quality and value through continuous improvement.

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