Investor Protection Act


DEFINITION of 'Investor Protection Act'

A component of the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 designed to expand the powers of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The act established a whistleblower reward for reporting financial fraud, increased liability for aiding and abetting, doubled funding to the SEC over a five-year period, and more. The act was part of regulators' attempt to prevent some of the problems that caused the financial crisis of 2008-2009 from reoccuring in the future.

BREAKING DOWN 'Investor Protection Act'

The Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 was created to improve accountability and transparency in the financial system. It included a Consumer Financial Protection Agency that would regulate mortgages, auto loans and credit cards.

  1. Consumer Financial Protection Act

    An amendment to the National Bank Act designed to identify and ...
  2. NCUA-Insured Institution

    A finance institution that is a participant of the National Credit ...
  3. FDIC Insured Account

    An account that meets the requirements to be covered or insured ...
  4. Financial Institutions Reform, ...

    A law enacted to ensure that real estate appraisals are performed ...
  5. National Credit Union Administration ...

    An agency of the United States federal government that was created ...
  6. Securities Investor Protection ...

    A nonprofit corporation created by an act of Congress to protect ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    9 Tips For Safeguarding Your Accounts

    When it comes to keeping your money safe, don't rely on the FDIC - there's much more you can do.
  2. Options & Futures

    Benefit Issues When Your Employer Goes Bankrupt

    There are some safeguards in place to ensure that health benefits don't just disappear when a plan is canceled.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Morningstar's Stewardship Grade Scores Big

    Morningstar's service gives investors an idea how well fund companies are safeguarding their interests.
  4. Financial Advisors

    SEC Audit? How Financial Advisors Can Be Ready

    Your firm may never be audited by the SEC, but you need to be prepared nonetheless. Follow these tips to make sure you're in compliance and organized.
  5. Investing Basics

    What are the fiduciary responsibilities of board members?

    Find out what fiduciary duties a board of directors owes to the company and its shareholders, including the duties of care, good faith and loyalty.
  6. Investing Basics

    4 Iconic Financial Companies That No Longer Exist

    Learn how poor management, frauds, scandals or mergers wiped out some of the most recognizable brands in the finance industry in the United States.
  7. Investing

    The Enormous Long-Term Cost of Holding Cash

    We take a look into how investors are still being impacted by the memory of the tech bubble and the advent of the last financial crisis.
  8. Active Trading

    What Is A Pyramid Scheme?

    The FTC announced it had opened an official investigation of Herbalife, which has been accused of running a pyramid scheme. But what exactly does that mean?
  9. Investing News

    What Affirmative Action Means for Businesses

    A look at what Affirmative Action means for your business.
  10. Options & Futures

    Terrorism's Effects on Wall Street

    Terrorist activity tends to have a negative impact on the markets, but just how much? Find out how to take cover.
  1. Which mutual funds made money in 2008?

    Out of the 2,800 mutual funds that Morningstar, Inc., the leading provider of independent investment research in North America, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the SEC's escheatment process?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) does not have its own escheatment process. Rather, the SEC notes that the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens if property is wrongfully escheated?

    If your financial accounts, such as bank, investment or savings accounts, are declared dormant and the managing financial ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
  2. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  3. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  4. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  5. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  6. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
Trading Center