J

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DEFINITION of 'J'

A Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that the stock has voting rights.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'J'

Nasdaq-listed securities have four or five characters. If a fifth letter appears, it indicates that the issue is other than a single issue of common or capital stock.

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