James E. Meade

DEFINITION of 'James E. Meade'

A Keynesian economist who won the 1977 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, along with Bertil Ohlin, for his research on international trade and international capital movements. Meade analyzed how government policies affected trade and how trade policies affected economic well being. He twice held economic positions in the British government, where his research affected economic policy in Britain after WWII. His other major research interest was mass unemployment.

BREAKING DOWN 'James E. Meade'

Meade taught commerce at the London School of Economics and political economy at Cambridge. He was also a member of the League of Nations in the economics section. James Meade was born in 1907 and died in 1995.

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