James E. Meade

DEFINITION of 'James E. Meade'

A Keynesian economist who won the 1977 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, along with Bertil Ohlin, for his research on international trade and international capital movements. Meade analyzed how government policies affected trade and how trade policies affected economic well being. He twice held economic positions in the British government, where his research affected economic policy in Britain after WWII. His other major research interest was mass unemployment.

BREAKING DOWN 'James E. Meade'

Meade taught commerce at the London School of Economics and political economy at Cambridge. He was also a member of the League of Nations in the economics section. James Meade was born in 1907 and died in 1995.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Richard Stone

    Richard Stone is a British economist who won the 1984 Nobel Memorial ...
  2. Paul Samuelson

    The first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, ...
  3. John R. Hicks

    A British economist who received the 1972 Nobel Memorial Prize ...
  4. Merton Miller

    A prominent Chicago school economist. Miller was born in 1923 ...
  5. Vernon L. Smith

    An American economist who won the Nobel Prize in Economics in ...
  6. John Maynard Keynes

    An author and economist who is well-known for his stance that ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Stocks to Eye with China's One-Child Policy Ended (MJN, PG)

    Here are four stocks to consider in the wake of China ending its one-child policy.
  2. Markets

    Central Bankers' Role in Keynesian Economics

    Learn about the role of monetary policy in Keynesian economics, and examine how central banks impacted aggregate demand in the aftermath of the 2008 crisis.
  3. Trading

    Giants Of Finance: John Maynard Keynes

    This rock star of economics advocated government intervention at a time of free-market thinking.
  4. Markets

    How Influential Economists Changed Our History

    Find out how these five groundbreaking thinkers laid our financial foundations.
  5. Markets

    Why Can't Economists Agree?

    There are many reasons why economists can be given the same data and come up with entirely different conclusions.
  6. Markets

    A Look At Fiscal And Monetary Policy

    There's a debate over which policy is better for the economy. Find out which side of the fence you're on.
  7. Markets

    Roll With Your Spinoff

    If you own a stock that's contemplating a spinoff, consider the possibility that the new entity rather than the parent is potentially lucrative.
  8. Markets

    Macroeconomics: Schools Of Thought

    By Stephen Simpson The field of macroeconomics is organized into many different schools of thought, with differing views on how the markets and their participants operate. ClassicalClassical ...
  9. Markets

    Microeconomics: A Brief History

    by Marc DavisAs early as the 18th century, economists were studying the decision-making processes of consumers, a principal concern of microeconomics. Swiss mathematician Nicholas Bernoulli (1695-1726) ...
  10. Markets

    Deflation and Debt: Is the United States the New Japan?

    Discover how mainstream macroeconomics has failed Japan and why the United States should take care to avoid Japan's borrow, spend and print model.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do I negotiate a lower annual percentage rate (APR) with my credit card company?

    Discover the main factors of economic policy that, according to Keynesian economic theory, drive the marginal propensity ... Read Answer >>
  2. Under what circumstances will a government change its monetary policy?

    Learn about the kind of variables, including political and theoretical factors, that can bring about change in a government's ... Read Answer >>
  3. What macroeconomic problems do policy makers most commonly face?

    Learn about the macroeconomic factors policymakers have to be concerned with when deciding on economic policies, such as ... Read Answer >>
  4. How does macroeconomics explain "stagflation"?

    Learn about stagflation: a macroeconomic term used to describe economic turmoil. It is a time of serious inflation, slow ... Read Answer >>
  5. Why is the multiplier effect associated with Keynesian economics?

    Learn what the Keynesian multiplier effect is and how it provided a justification for increased government spending in the ... Read Answer >>
  6. What are key economic growth rates that can be used to determine the economic health ...

    Discover the indicators that correlate with real economic health, and learn why many traditional metrics do not function ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Brazil, Russia, India And China - BRIC

    An acronym for the economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China combined. It has been speculated that by 2050 these four ...
  2. Brexit

    The Brexit, an abbreviation of "British exit" that mirrors the term Grexit, refers to the possibility of Britain's withdrawal ...
  3. Underweight

    1. A situation where a portfolio does not hold a sufficient amount of a particular security when compared to the security's ...
  4. Russell 3000 Index

    A market capitalization weighted equity index maintained by the Russell Investment Group that seeks to be a benchmark of ...
  5. Enterprise Value (EV)

    A measure of a company's value, often used as an alternative to straightforward market capitalization. Enterprise value is ...
  6. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position in a publicly-traded corporation (stock), a creditor relationship ...
Trading Center