James H. Clark

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Dictionary Says

Definition of 'James H. Clark'


A serial and successful entrepreneur perhaps best known for co-founding Netscape in 1994 along with Marc Andreessen. Netscape Navigator became the market leader in internet browsers, but because it was not free to use, it lost market share to competitor Internet Explorer and was purchased by AOL in 1998. Clark's other ventures include founding Silicon Graphics, a company that produced visual effects for film and 3-D images for engineers and counted George Lucas and Steven Spielberg among its customers; founding Healtheon, which merged with WebMD; and being the original investor and chairman of digital photo website Shutterfly, founded in 1999.
Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'James H. Clark'


Born in Texas in 1944, Clark went into the Navy after dropping out of high school. He later returned to formal education, eventually earning a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Utah. Clark is also a former associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University and major benefactor of the James H. Clark Center, home of the Bio-X bioscience research program, at Stanford.
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