James H. Clark

AAA

DEFINITION of 'James H. Clark'

A serial and successful entrepreneur perhaps best known for co-founding Netscape in 1994 along with Marc Andreessen. Netscape Navigator became the market leader in internet browsers, but because it was not free to use, it lost market share to competitor Internet Explorer and was purchased by AOL in 1998. Clark's other ventures include founding Silicon Graphics, a company that produced visual effects for film and 3-D images for engineers and counted George Lucas and Steven Spielberg among its customers; founding Healtheon, which merged with WebMD; and being the original investor and chairman of digital photo website Shutterfly, founded in 1999.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'James H. Clark'

Born in Texas in 1944, Clark went into the Navy after dropping out of high school. He later returned to formal education, eventually earning a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Utah. Clark is also a former associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University and major benefactor of the James H. Clark Center, home of the Bio-X bioscience research program, at Stanford.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Chairman

    An executive elected by a company's board of directors that is ...
  2. Corporate Headquarters

    A place where a company's executive offices and executives' direct ...
  3. Corporate Action

    Any event that brings material change to a company and affects ...
  4. Corporate Governance

    The system of rules, practices and processes by which a company ...
  5. Inside Director

    A board member who is an employee, officer or stakeholder in ...
  6. Insider

    A director or senior officer of a company, as well as any person ...
Related Articles
  1. Are You An Entrepreneur?
    Entrepreneurship

    Are You An Entrepreneur?

  2. Reality Check: Why Startups Fail
    Entrepreneurship

    Reality Check: Why Startups Fail

  3. Seek An Adventure In Venture Capital
    Personal Finance

    Seek An Adventure In Venture Capital

  4. Why was Microsoft subject to antitrust ...
    Options & Futures

    Why was Microsoft subject to antitrust ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  2. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious ...
  3. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the ...
  4. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by ...
  5. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will ...
  6. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The ...
Trading Center