James J. Heckman

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DEFINITION of 'James J. Heckman'

An American economist who won the 2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, along with Daniel McFadden, for his Heckman correction, a statistical method of correcting for self-selection bias in research. In addition to selection bias and self-selection, Heckman's research has focused on labor economics and human development, and skill formation (especially early childhood development).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'James J. Heckman'

Heckman was born in 1944 in Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton and won the John Bates Clark medal in 1983. He has worked as a professor of economics at University College in Dublin; he also taught at the University of Chicago, Columbia and Yale.

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