Japan ETFs

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Japan ETFs'


A type of exchange-traded fund that invests the majority of its assets in Japanese equities that trade on local stock exchanges. The performance of Japan ETFs does not correlate to the performance of the underlying index when measured in U.S. dollars, because the change in the exchange rate between the yen and the dollar must be taken into consideration. The performance of Japan ETFs is thus dependent on two things: the performance of the underlying equities and the effect of changing yen into dollars.

Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Japan ETFs'


Japan ETFs are managed passively around a broad underlying index, such as the MSCI Japan Index, which represents over 75% of the total market capitalization of all listed Japanese equities.

The Tokyo Stock Exchange is one of the largest and most progressive markets in Asia, making the country a frequent source of investor focus and attention. Japan ETFs allow for a single diversified investment in the country while also making a bet on the strength of the yen versus the dollar.

Because of the depth of Japan's equity markets, ETFs that focus on large- or small-cap stocks are available. As with several of the larger, more liquid ETFs, some Japan ETFs can be sold short and are even accessible through listed options.

Related Video for 'Japan ETFs'

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  2. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  3. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  4. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  5. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  6. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
Trading Center