Jeff Bezos

Definition of 'Jeff Bezos'


Self-made billionaire Jeff Bezos is the founder of online retail giant Amazon.com. Born in 1964 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Bezos was raised by his mother and stepfather. One of his earliest entrepreneurial ventures was a children’s education camp that he ran as a teenager with his girlfriend one summer.

Investopedia explains 'Jeff Bezos'


Bezos earned his Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton in 1986. After graduation, he became one of the first employees at Fitel, which manufactures optical fibers. He later joined Bankers Trust, then left to join a hedge fund where he quickly became senior vice president.

Bezos left the hedge fund in 1994 because he saw the Internet taking off and decided to become part of it. He founded Amazon.com in Seattle that year as an online bookseller. He located the company in Seattle in part because Washington’s small population meant few customers would have to pay sales tax on their purchases since companies did not have to charge sales tax in states where they lacked a physical presence.

The company went public in 1997, and started selling CDs in 1998. Time magazine named him person of the year in 1999. Amazon continued expanding to sell electronics, housewares, apparel and more. It released the Kindle in 2007, the Kindle Fire in 2011, and the Kindle Fire HD in 2012 to directly compete with Apple’s iPad at a significantly lower price point.

Carnegie Mellon University awarded him an honorary doctorate in 2008. Bezos is also the owner of Seattle-based Blue Origin, a space exploration company, and bought the Washington Post in 2013. Forbes places him at No. 20 on its list of the world’s billionaires as of 2014, with an estimated net worth of $30.6 billion.

He married wife Mackenzie in 1993, and they have four children.



comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Passive ETF

    One of two types of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) available for investors. Passive ETFs are index funds that track a specific benchmark, such as a SPDR. Unlike actively managed ETFs, passive ETFs are not managed by a fund manager on a daily basis.
  2. Walras' Law

    An economics law that suggests that the existence of excess supply in one market must be matched by excess demand in another market so that it balances out. So when examining a specific market, if all other markets are in equilibrium, Walras' Law asserts that the examined market is also in equilibrium.
  3. Market Segmentation

    A marketing term referring to the aggregating of prospective buyers into groups (segments) that have common needs and will respond similarly to a marketing action. Market segmentation enables companies to target different categories of consumers who perceive the full value of certain products and services differently from one another.
  4. Effective Annual Interest Rate

    An investment's annual rate of interest when compounding occurs more often than once a year. Calculated as the following:
  5. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option is purchased and the lower premium option is sold - both at the same time. The higher the debit spread, the greater the initial cash outflow the investor will incur on the transaction.
  6. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious debt when government leaders use borrowed funds in ways that don't benefit or even oppress citizens. Some legal scholars argue that successor governments should not be held accountable for odious debt incurred by earlier regimes, but there is no consensus on how odious debt should actually be treated.
Trading Center