Jekyll and Hyde

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DEFINITION of 'Jekyll and Hyde'

1. A slang term referring to the strengths and weaknesses of a company's financial statements.

2. An asset that suddenly increases or decreases in value.

3. A senior manager's good and bad qualities, or the polarized views between two key officers within a corporation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Jekyll and Hyde'

This term is derived from R. L. Stevenson's "The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." Dr Jekyll, the atypical good scientist, unleashes his dark side, nicknamed Mr Hyde, through self-experimentation. Although Jekyll and Hyde have contradictory natures, they are one and the same person.

1. At first glance Jekyll and Hyde financial statements may seem to show strong performance, but a closer look reveals covert weaknesses.

2. Volatile stock that fluctuates widely in price is an example of a Jekyll and Hyde.

3. If two officials of a company both envision important but conflicting goals, it is called a Jekyll and Hyde situation.

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