Jekyll and Hyde


DEFINITION of 'Jekyll and Hyde'

1. A slang term referring to the strengths and weaknesses of a company's financial statements.

2. An asset that suddenly increases or decreases in value.

3. A senior manager's good and bad qualities, or the polarized views between two key officers within a corporation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Jekyll and Hyde'

This term is derived from R. L. Stevenson's "The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." Dr Jekyll, the atypical good scientist, unleashes his dark side, nicknamed Mr Hyde, through self-experimentation. Although Jekyll and Hyde have contradictory natures, they are one and the same person.

1. At first glance Jekyll and Hyde financial statements may seem to show strong performance, but a closer look reveals covert weaknesses.

2. Volatile stock that fluctuates widely in price is an example of a Jekyll and Hyde.

3. If two officials of a company both envision important but conflicting goals, it is called a Jekyll and Hyde situation.

  1. Volatility

    1. A statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given ...
  2. Asset

    1. A resource with economic value that an individual, corporation ...
  3. Mad Hatter

    A CEO or managerial team whose ability to lead a company is highly ...
  4. Leprechaun Leader

    A corporate manager or an executive who, like the fabled Irish ...
  5. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
  6. Racketeering

    A fraudulent service built to serve a problem that wouldn't otherwise ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Haunting Wall Street: The Halloween Terminology Of Investing

    Beware of zombies and Jekyll and Hyde companies! Read about the spooky terms circulating Wall Street.
  2. Investing Basics

    Elves And Gnomes: Fairy Tale Investment Terms

    What do elves have to do with investing? Meet the fairytale creatures running around Wall Street.
  3. Economics

    The Difference Between Finance And Economics

    Finance and economics are often taught as separate subjects, but they are interrelated disciplines that influence one another in many ways.
  4. Investing

    What’s the Difference Between Duration & Maturity?

    We look at the meaning of two terms that often get confused, duration and maturity, to set the record straight.
  5. Investing Basics

    Investopedia's Oddest Business and Investing Terms

    Think finance and investing are boring? These terms will prove you wrong.
  6. Professionals

    5 Career-Killing Facebook Mistakes

    Facebook might be a great way to show off those cute pics from your vacation -- but your page isn’t so great if it hurts your career.
  7. Investing

    Why Is Financial Literacy and Education so Important?

    Financial literacy is the confluence of financial, credit and debt knowledge that is necessary to make the financial decisions that are integral to our everyday lives.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Silo Mentality

    A silo mentality occurs when certain departments in an organization do not share information or knowledge with other departments.
  9. Economics

    5 Steps of a Bubble

    In the financial sense, a bubble refers to a situation where the price of an asset far exceeds its fundamental value.
  10. Investing Basics

    What's a Price-Taker?

    Price-taker is an economic term describing a market participant who has no effect on overall market activity.
  1. What is the expense ratio in the insurance industry?

    The expense ratio in the insurance industry is a measure of profitability calculated by dividing the expenses associated ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the benefit of the Modified Internal Rate Of Return (MIRR)?

    The modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a financing metric used in business capital budgeting. Its primary benefit ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is the Modified Internal Rate Of Return (MIRR) preferable to the regular internal ...

    Even though the internal rate of return metric is popular among business managers, it tends to overstate the profitability ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Who sets the guidelines for accounting principles?

    While the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are not a strict requirement of all U.S. corporations, the guidelines ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Which US cities have the highest number of high-income households?

    According to the most recent U.S. Census report on the geographic concentration of high-income households conducted in 2 ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens when a company defaults on its commercial paper obligations?

    As a practical matter, the Issuing and Paying Agent, or IPA, is responsible for reporting the commercial paper issuer's default ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bar Chart

    A style of chart used by some technical analysts, on which, as illustrated below, the top of the vertical line indicates ...
  2. Bullish Engulfing Pattern

    A chart pattern that forms when a small black candlestick is followed by a large white candlestick that completely eclipses ...
  3. Cyber Monday

    An expression used in online retailing to describe the Monday following U.S. Thanksgiving weekend. Cyber Monday is generally ...
  4. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
  5. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
Trading Center