Jerry A. Hausman

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DEFINITION of 'Jerry A. Hausman'

An economics professor and director of the MIT Telecommunications Economics Research Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Hausman's research has focused on applied microeconomics, econometrics, differentiated products, telecommunications, taxation, energy, aging, the environment and energy. Born in West Virginia in 1946, he first joined MIT in 1973 as an assistant professor.

BREAKING DOWN 'Jerry A. Hausman'

Hausman holds a Ph.D. from Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and has earned numerous awards, honors and fellowships, including the John Bates Clark Award and the Frisch Medal. His well-known Hausman Specification Test shows whether statistical models correspond to the data. He is widely published and has been an associate or advisory editor for numerous economics journals.



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