Job Footprint

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DEFINITION of 'Job Footprint'

The scope and range of an employee's duties while under a company's employ. A secretary's job footprint might include answering phones, greeting visitors, scheduling meetings and appointments and typing up documents. If she were promoted to office manager, her job footprint might change or expand to include ordering office supplies and equipment, managing office recordkeeping and filing systems and overseeing all administrative support staff.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Job Footprint'

Employees generally expect that, as their job footprint increases, their pay and/or benefits will increase to compensate them for the additional work. One feature of the 2008-2009 recession was that employees who kept their jobs saw their job footprints increase as they took over the responsibilities of laid off workers, but they did not receive any, or very little, increase in pay or benefits.

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