John A. Allison IV

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DEFINITION of 'John A. Allison IV'

A former chairman and CEO of BB&T Corporation, a North Carolina-based financial holding company, from 1989 to 2008, and a member of the company's board of directors. He is known for dramatically increasing the bank's assets to make it one of the largest banks in the United States.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'John A. Allison IV'

Born in 1948 in North Carolina, Allison earned an MBA from Duke University and joined BB&T in 1971 as a manager in the financial analysis department.
Allison is also a strong proponent of Ayn Rand's objectivist philosophy and has donated several million dollars to university programs to support study in this discipline.

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