John B. Taylor


DEFINITION of 'John B. Taylor'

An economics professor and expert on monetary policy. John B. Taylor is best known for the paper he submitted in 1993 outlining the Taylor Rule. This rule outlines a method for central banks to determine interest rates.

BREAKING DOWN 'John B. Taylor'

John B. Taylor has worked as a professor of economics at Stanford University and was the Bowen and Janice Arthur McCoy Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He also taught at Columbia University and the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton. Taylor has also served as under-secretary of the Treasury for international affairs under the George W. Bush administration.

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