John Harsanyi


DEFINITION of 'John Harsanyi'

An economist who won the Nobel Memorial Prize in 1994 along with John Nash and Reinhard Selten for his research on game theory, a mathematical system for predicting the outcomes of competitions and conflicts. Harsanyi is also noted for his contributions to moral philosophy.

BREAKING DOWN 'John Harsanyi'

Born in 1920 in Budapest, Harsanyi escaped first the Nazis and then communist Hungary to end up in Australia before coming to the United States. Having already earned a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Budapest, he went on to earn another Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and became a professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

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