John T. Chambers

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DEFINITION

The president and CEO of Cisco Systems, a consumer electronics, networking and communications technology company, since 1995 and chairman since 2006. Chambers joined the company in 1991 as senior vice president of Worldwide Sales and Operations.


Among Chambers' numerous leadership awards, he has been named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People and has repeatedly earned Cisco a spot on Fortune's "America's Most Admired Company" list. Cisco has also been named a top place to work in India, Australia, Belgium, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Norway, France, Italy, Germany, the U.K. and Canada.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Born in 1949 in Cleveland, Chambers earned his undergraduate and law degrees from West Virginia University and his MBA from Indiana University. Chambers previously worked at Wang Laboratories and IBM, and is a former Walmart board member.








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