Joint Endorsement

DEFINITION of 'Joint Endorsement'

The type of endorsement that is required on any type of joint account. Checks that are payable to more than one party often require this joint endorsement. Joint endorsements are generally required in order to prevent one individual on a joint account from cashing a check without the knowledge or permission of the other.

BREAKING DOWN 'Joint Endorsement'

Joint endorsements are usually required by banks before they will cash certain kinds of checks. Checks issued by the U.S. Government, such as tax refund checks, typically fall into this category. Joint endorsements can be required regardless of whether the underlying account is "tenants in common," "tenants with rights of survivorship" or "tenants by the entirety."

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