Joint Supply

DEFINITION of 'Joint Supply '

An economic term referring to a product or process that can yield two or more outputs. Common examples occur within the livestock industry: cows can be utilized for milk, beef and hide; sheep can be utilized for meat, wool and sheepskin. If the supply of cows increases, so will the supply of dairy and beef products.

BREAKING DOWN 'Joint Supply '

Where joint supply exists, the supply and demand for each product is linked to the others originating from the same source. For example, if demand increases for wool, and sheep farmers therefore raise more animals for wool, there will eventually be increased sheep meat production, resulting in greater meat supply and potentially lower prices.

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