A legal term describing a transaction or agreement where two or more parties act in unison.

Joint can refer to a variety of situations, including:
- joint accounts, where two or more parties share a single account, such as a bank or brokerage account
- joint tenancies, where two or more parties share ownership in real property, such as joint tenants in common or tenancy by the entirety (a type of joint tenancy that exists only between a husband and wife)
- annuities, such as joint and survivor annuities, insurance products that continue regular payments as long as one of the annuitants is alive, and
- joint ventures, where two unaffiliated companies contribute financial and/or physical assets, as well as personnel, to a new company.


In addition to pertaining to accounts or ownership in real property, joint can also refer to liability. Joint liability exists in situations where two or more people share the burden of a debt. For example, if a husband and wife have joint liability for a debt, each is responsible for the entire amount of the debt. Several liability, on the other hand, would limit liability to each person's respective obligations.

  1. Joint Return

    A U.S. income tax return filed on behalf of a married couple, ...
  2. Joint Bond

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  3. Joint Owned Property

    Any property held in the name of two or more parties. The two ...
  4. Joint And Survivor Annuity

    An insurance product that continues regular payments as long ...
  5. Joint Stock Company

    An organization that falls between the definitions of a partnership ...
  6. Jointly and Severally

    1. A legal term describing a partnership in which individual ...
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  1. Will jointly filing taxes have the effect of joining a couple's credit?

    The only thing that "joins" the credit of a married couple is the ownership of joint accounts. In other words, if there ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. If two people own a securities account, listed as joint tenants-in-common, it means:

    A. They each have an undivided interest in the propertyB. If one dies, that person's interest does not automatically ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can I borrow from my annuity to put a down payment on a house?

    You can borrow from your annuity to put a down payment on a house, but be prepared to pay an assortment of fees and penalties. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the main kinds of annuities?

    There are two broad categories of annuity: fixed and variable. These categories refer to the manner in which the investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the risks of rolling my 401(k) into an annuity?

    Though the appeal of having guaranteed income after retirement is undeniable, there are actually a number of risks to consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I get out of my annuity and transfer to a new one?

    If you decide your current annuity is not for you, there is nothing stopping you from transferring your investment to a new ... Read Full Answer >>

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