Joint And Survivor Annuity

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DEFINITION of 'Joint And Survivor Annuity'

An insurance product that continues regular payments as long as one of the annuitants is alive. A joint and survivor annuity must have two or more annuitants, and is often purchased by married couples who want to guarantee that a surviving spouse will receive regular income for life. Annuities are generally used to provide a steady income during retirement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Joint And Survivor Annuity'

Different types of joint and survivor annuities are available. For example, a joint and one-half annuity would reduce the payments to one-half of the original payment amount following the death of the first annuitant; and a joint and two-thirds annuity would reduce the payments to two-thirds the initial payment amount. A joint and survivor annuity is often appropriate for married couples who want to make sure the surviving spouse will continue to receive payments for life. This differs from other annuity products where it would be possible for a surviving spouse to outlive income payments.

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