Joint Venture - JV


DEFINITION of 'Joint Venture - JV'

A business arrangement in which two or more parties agree to pool their resources for the purpose of accomplishing a specific task. This task can be a new project or any other business activity. In a joint venture (JV), each of the participants is responsible for profits, losses and costs associated with it. However, the venture is its own entity, separate and apart from the participants' other business interests.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Joint Venture - JV'

Although JVs represent a great way to pool capital and expertise and reduce the exposure of risk to all involved, they do present some unique challenges as well. For instance, if party A comes up with an idea that allows the JV to flourish, what cut of the profits does party A get? Does the party simply receive a cut based on the original investment pool or is there recognition of the party's contribution above and beyond the initial stake? For this and other reasons, it is estimated that nearly half of all JVs last less than four years and end in animosity.

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