Junior Accountant

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DEFINITION of 'Junior Accountant'

An entry-level position in an accounting department. A college degree in accounting is usually a prerequisite for this position. Other desirable attributes include mathematical aptitude and analytical ability. A junior accountant would usually be supervised by a senior accountant or accounting manager. Duties and responsibilities vary with the organization, but generally include posting journal entries, updating financial statements, preparing monthly financial reports, calculating payroll taxes, auditing and maintaining accounts receivable and payable.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Junior Accountant'

The junior accountant position would appeal to those considering a career in accounting because of its many advantages which include above-average earnings potential and access to wide-ranging clientèle. The accounting profession is likely to see sustained demand because corporations and small businesses require accounting services on an ongoing basis.

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