Kairi Relative Index

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DEFINITION of 'Kairi Relative Index'

A technical indicator used to spot relationships in trending markets. The Kairi Relative Index was created long ago in Japan by an unknown founder and bears resemblance to the Relative Strength Index.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Kairi Relative Index'

The Kairi Relative Index is considered an oscillator as well as a leading indicator. The Index calculates a deviation of the current price from its simple moving average as a percentage of the moving average. By recognizing trending markets that are overextended, traders hope to capitalize on the downside.

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