DEFINITION of 'Kangaroo Bond'

A type of foreign bond that is issued in the Australian market by non-Australian firms and is denominated in Australian currency. The bond is subject to Australian laws and regulations.

Also known as a "matilda bond."

BREAKING DOWN 'Kangaroo Bond'

Foreign bonds, such as kangaroo bonds, are mainly used to provide issuers with access to another capital market outside of their own to raise capital. Also, major corporations and/or investment firms looking to diversify their holdings and improve their overall currency exposures can use kangaroo bonds to raise funds in Australian dollars. Major issuers of kangaroo bonds have typically been from the United States Germany. Other foreign bonds include samurai bonds and bulldog bonds.

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