Kiasu

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Kiasu'

A Chinese adjective used to describe a person's fear of losing out (to someone else). Kiasu is a traditional Chinese word, but is most popular in Singapore. It translates roughly as "scared to lose".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Kiasu'

Kiasu describes being (or a person who is) greedy, unwilling to share, or competitive in order to advance one's self. Examples of Kiasu include driving aggressively to get to the front of a traffic line or registering young children early at top schools, prior even to knowing the child's aptitude. Kiasu describes the idea that one must outdo and outshine all others, have more of any given thing, pay the least amount for items (thereby getting the best deal) and always be the first or best.


This concept has been applied to such financial ideas as marketing campaigns, store sales and understanding market psychology.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Infectious Greed

    A phrase used in his July 2002 testimony before the Committee ...
  2. Market Psychology

    The overall sentiment or feeling that the market is experiencing ...
  3. Emotional Neutrality

    The concept of removing greed, fear and other human emotions ...
  4. Maximum Drawdown (MDD)

    The maximum loss from a peak to a trough of a portfolio, before ...
  5. Gross Exposure

    The absolute level of a fund's investments.
  6. Behavioral Modeling

    Using available and relevant consumer and business spending data ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do you use a financial calculator to determine present value?

    Determining the present value of a given cash flow is based on the concept that money today is inherently worth more than ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the most effective ways to reduce moral hazard?

    There are a number of ways to reduce moral hazard, including the offering of incentives, policies to prevent immoral behavior ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the theory of asymmetric information in economics?

    The theory of asymmetric information was developed in the 1970s and 1980s as a plausible explanation for common phenomena ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does market risk differ from specific risk?

    Market risk and specific risk are two different forms of risk that affect assets. All investment assets can be separated ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is perpetuity used in the Dividend Discount Model?

    The basic dividend discount model (DDM) creates an estimate of the constant growth rate, in perpetuity, expected for dividends ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How valid is the notion of economies of scope?

    The concept of economies of scope is widely accepted in both managerial and theoretical economics. It proposes that it is ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Losing Money? Don't Blame Your Broker

    Tempting as it is to pass the buck for your losses, the true culprit may be closer to home.
  2. Brokers

    How To Avoid Falling Prey To The Next Madoff Scam

    Due diligence does work, but the loose reporting standards for hedge funds make extra care and attention necessary.
  3. Options & Futures

    Owners Can Be Deal Killers In M&A

    A merger and acquisition advisor is often the best choice when selling a company.
  4. Active Trading

    The Financial Markets: When Fear And Greed Take Over

    If these unpleasant emotions are allowed to influence your decision-making, they may cost you dearly.
  5. Options & Futures

    Due Diligence In 10 Easy Steps

    Got a hot stock tip? Follow up on it with these tips to avoid getting burned.
  6. Economics

    What Is Supply?

    Supply is the amount of goods a producer is willing to produce at a given price, and is one of the most basic concepts in economics.
  7. Economics

    Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR)

    Modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a variant of the more traditional internal rate of return calculation.
  8. Investing Basics

    Market Simulators: How To Outperform Warren Buffett

    That moment when you realize you just booked $108 million dollars in less than an hour: it puts butterflies in your stomach.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Invest in Emerging Market Currencies with this ETF

    Why this emerging market currency ETF needs to be on your radar.
  10. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center