Kiosk

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DEFINITION of 'Kiosk'

A small, temporary, standalone booth used in high-foot-traffic areas for marketing purposes. A kiosk will usually be manned by one or two individuals who help attract attention to the booth to get new customers.







INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Kiosk'

Because of their small, temporary nature, kiosks can be a low-cost marketing strategy. They are also a good way to give a company a human face, and provide customers the opportunity to ask questions about a product.


For example, a local newspaper might set up a kiosk at a grocery store to try to sign up new subscribers. Similarly, credit card companies often set up kiosks in airports to seek new customers for a credit card that offers frequent-flyer miles.

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