Kiosk

A A A

DEFINITION

A small, temporary, standalone booth used in high-foot-traffic areas for marketing purposes. A kiosk will usually be manned by one or two individuals who help attract attention to the booth to get new customers.









INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Because of their small, temporary nature, kiosks can be a low-cost marketing strategy. They are also a good way to give a company a human face, and provide customers the opportunity to ask questions about a product.


For example, a local newspaper might set up a kiosk at a grocery store to try to sign up new subscribers. Similarly, credit card companies often set up kiosks in airports to seek new customers for a credit card that offers frequent-flyer miles.




RELATED TERMS
  1. Viral Marketing

    Internet advertising or marketing that spreads exponentially whenever a new ...
  2. Banner Advertising

    A rectangular graphic display that stretches across the top or bottom of a website ...
  3. Business To Consumer - B To C

    Business or transactions conducted directly between a company and consumers ...
  4. Marketing

    The activities of a company associated with buying and selling a product or ...
  5. Product Differentiation

    A marketing process that showcases the differences between products. Differentiation ...
  6. Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) ...

    These are consumer goods products that sell quickly at relatively low cost – ...
  7. Customer To Customer (C2C)

    A business model that facilitates an environment where customers can trade with ...
  8. Door Crasher

    A low-priced item of limited quantity typically offered on special, early-opening ...
  9. Doorbuster

    A marketing and sales strategy retailers use to get a high volume of customers ...
  10. Mass Market Retailer

    A company that sells affordably priced products that appeal to a wide variety ...
Related Articles
  1. How To Target Ideal Customers
    Professionals

    How To Target Ideal Customers

  2. Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats
    Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

  3. Don't Be Misled By Investment Advertising
    Home & Auto

    Don't Be Misled By Investment Advertising

  4. The Lucrative World Of Third-Party Marketing
    Professionals

    The Lucrative World Of Third-Party Marketing

  5. 4 Consumer Goods Stocks to Watch
    Chart Advisor

    4 Consumer Goods Stocks to Watch

  6. As Boomers Slow Down, Will The Economy ...
    Investing News

    As Boomers Slow Down, Will The Economy ...

  7. Is Now The Time To Short Retail?
    Chart Advisor

    Is Now The Time To Short Retail?

  8. Four Ways To Spot An Emerging Market
    Investing Basics

    Four Ways To Spot An Emerging Market

  9. How We'll All Be Amazon.com Customers ...
    Investing News

    How We'll All Be Amazon.com Customers ...

  10. Let Consumer Spending Trends Lead You ...
    Chart Advisor

    Let Consumer Spending Trends Lead You ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Degree Of Financial Leverage - DFL

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings per share (EPS) to fluctuations in its operating income, as a result of changes in its capital structure. Degree of Financial Leverage (DFL) measures the percentage change in EPS for a unit change in earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT).
  2. Jeff Bezos

    Self-made billionaire Jeff Bezos is famous for founding online retail giant Amazon.com.
  3. Re-fracking

    Re-fracking is the practice of returning to older wells that had been fracked in the recent past to capitalize on newer, more effective extraction technology. Re-fracking can be effective on especially tight oil deposits – where the shale products low yields – to extend their productivity.
  4. TIMP (acronym)

    'TIMP' is an acronym that stands for 'Turkey, Indonesia, Mexico and Philippines.' Similar to BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China), the acronym was coined by and investor/economist to group fast-growing emerging market economies in similar states of economic development.
  5. Pension Risk Transfer

    When a defined benefit pension provider offloads some or all of the plan’s risk – e.g.: retirement payment liabilities to former employee beneficiaries. The plan sponsor can do this by offering vested plan participants a lump-sum payment to voluntarily leave the plan, or by negotiating with an insurance company to take on the responsibility for paying benefits.
  6. XW

    A symbol used to signify that a security is trading ex-warrant. XW is one of many alphabetic qualifiers that act as a shorthand to tell investors key information about a specific security in a stock quote. These qualifiers should not be confused with ticker symbols, some of which, like qualifiers, are just one or two letters.
Trading Center