Kiwi Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Kiwi Bond'

Retail stock offered directly to the public and available only to New Zealand residents. Application forms and investment statements are available from the new Zealand Debt Management Office (NZDMO) Registry, as well as some registered banks, NZX firms, NZX brokers, chartered accountant, solicitors, investment advisors and investment brokers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Kiwi Bond'

New Zealanders are often referred to as Kiwis. Kiwi bonds are denominated in new Zealand dollars, with a fixed interest rate that is paid quarterly in arrears. Kiwi bonds are redeemable on maturity or at the option of the bondholder and are issued in six-month, one-year and two-year maturities. The minimum investment is $1,000 New Zealand dollars, with a maximum investment of $500,000 on any single issue. Interest rates for Kiwi bonds are set periodically by the New Zealand Debt Management Office (NZDMO) based on moving averages of domestic wholesale rates.

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