Kremlinomics

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DEFINITION of 'Kremlinomics'

A financial buzz word used to describe economic policies which some view to be overly leftist. Kremlinomics alludes to the communist policies of the Russian government during the Cold War and is by all accounts considered an unwanted connotation in industrialized nations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Kremlinomics'

The term kremlinomics gained popularity during the early months of the Obama administration in the United States. Obama's detractors saw his policies as socialist or leftist, and used the term to voice their displeasure with the president and his administration.

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