Lady Macbeth Strategy

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DEFINITION of 'Lady Macbeth Strategy'

A corporate-takeover strategy with which a third party poses as a white knight to gain trust, but then turns around and joins with unfriendly bidders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Lady Macbeth Strategy'

Lady Macbeth, one of Shakespeare's most frightful and ambitious characters, devises a cunning plan for her husband, the Scottish general, to kill Duncan, the King of Scotland. The success of Lady Macbeth's scheme lies in her deceptive ability to appear noble and virtuous, and thereby secure Duncan's trust in the Macbeths' false loyalty.

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