Landlord

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DEFINITION of 'Landlord'

A real estate owner who rents or leases land or a building to another party, known as a tenant. The landlord will often provide the necessary maintenance or repairs during the rental period, while the tenant is responsible for the cleanliness and general upkeep of the property.

A female landlord may be referred to as a "landlady."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Landlord'

For real estate investors, becoming a landlord can be a profitable venture. It often provides a steady stream of income from the renter, while maintaining ownership over a property that is likely to appreciate in value.

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