Land Rehabilitation


DEFINITION of 'Land Rehabilitation'

A re-engineering process that attempts to restore an area of land back to its natural state after it has been damaged as a result of some sort of disruption. The process involves such things as removing all man-made structures, toxins and other dangerous substances, improving the soil conditions and adding new flora.

BREAKING DOWN 'Land Rehabilitation'

Although land rehabilitation is most often used to rectify problems caused by man-made processes such as mining, oil drilling and other petrol-chemical related processes, it is also used to "clean up" natural processes. For example, natural disasters such as earthquakes and flooding can also cause damage to the natural environment. Land rehabilitation techniques can be used to speed up the amount of time necessary to restore the location to back to its original state.

The demand for reclamation or rehabilitation has increased during the last few decades as resource firms become increasingly environmentally conscious and new environmental-protection laws are introduced. However, rehabilitation can be a very costly process, especially if there is a toxic cleanup involved.

  1. Reclamation

    The right to reclaim property in the event of non-payment, fraud ...
  2. Externality

    A consequence of an economic activity that is experienced by ...
  3. Social Responsibility

    The idea that companies should embrace its social responsibilities ...
  4. Rust Bowl

    A geographic region that was formerly a manufacturing or industrial ...
  5. Oil Sands

    Sand and rock material which contains crude bitumen (a heavy, ...
  6. Abatement Cost

    A cost borne by many businesses for the removal and/or reduction ...
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge

    These diverse asset classes can provide downside protection and upside potential. Find out how to use them.
  2. Forex Education

    Commodity Prices And Currency Movements

    Find out which currencies are most affected by fluctuations in gold and oil prices, and improve your trading.
  3. Economics

    Understanding Income Inequality

    Income inequality refers to the uneven distribution of income across a single economy.
  4. Insurance

    What is a Force Majeure?

    A force majeure clause frees both parties in a contract from fulfilling their obligations in the event of some catastrophic or unexpected occurrence.
  5. Economics

    Calculating Cross Elasticity of Demand

    Cross elasticity of demand measures the quantity demanded of one good in response to a change in price of another.
  6. Economics

    What's Economic Capital?

    While regulatory and economic capital use some of the same measurements of risk to determine how much capital a firm should hold in reserve, economic capital uses more realistic measures.
  7. Economics

    What is Economic Rent?

    Economic rent typically occurs when a product, service or property is in short supply, but demand is high.
  8. Economics

    Oil Is Cheaper Than Bread In Venezuela...The Country Is In Chaos

    Venezuela is floundering, and the story has more to do with just the falling price of oil.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Production Efficiency

    Production efficiency is the point at which an economy cannot increase output of a good or service without lowering the production of another product.
  10. Economics

    What Does a Central Bank Do?

    A central bank oversees a nation’s monetary system.
  1. What is the relationship between oil prices and inflation?

    The price of oil and inflation are often seen as being connected in a cause and effect relationship. As oil prices move up ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is Colombia an emerging market economy?

    Colombia meets the criteria of an emerging market economy. The South American country has a much lower gross domestic product, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is Mexico an emerging market economy?

    Mexico meets all the criteria of an emerging market economy. The country's gross domestic product, or GDP, per capita beats ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is Argentina a developed country?

    Argentina is not a developed country. It has one of the strongest economies in South America or Central America and ranks ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Is Brazil a developed country?

    Brazil is not a developed country. Though it has the largest economy in South America or Central America, Brazil is still ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between marginal utility and marginal value?

    Depending on the context, marginal utility and marginal value can describe the same thing. The key word for each is "marginal," ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  2. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  3. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  4. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  5. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  6. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!