Last-Sale Reporting

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DEFINITION of 'Last-Sale Reporting'

An electronic entry, to the Nasdaq stock market, of the amount and price of shares involved in a transaction's not less than a board lot.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Last-Sale Reporting'

Trades reported must be submitted to Nasdaq within 90 seconds of the execution of the trade.

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