Lawrence Klein

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DEFINITION of 'Lawrence Klein'

An American economist and winner of the 1980 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for his studies of econometrics and the creation of computer models that became widely used by other economists. In addition to econometrics, a discipline that combines statistics with economics to forecast trends, Klein's research also focuses on macroeconomics.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Lawrence Klein'

Born in 1920 in Omaha, Neb., Klein earned his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology while studying and writing his dissertation under fellow economist and Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson. He has also taught at the University of Michigan, Oxford University and the University of Pennsylvania, won the John Bates Clark Medal, and was the chief economic advisor to President Jimmy Carter.



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