Liability Driven Investment - LDI

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Liability Driven Investment - LDI'

A form of investing in which the main goal is to gain sufficient assets to meet all liabilities, both current and future. This form of investing is most prominent with defined-benefit pension plans, whose liabilities can often reach into the billions of dollars for the largest of plans.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Liability Driven Investment - LDI'

LDIs are most prominent in the funding schemes of defined-benefit pension plans, which are designed to provide a predetermined pension upon retirement. The liabilities in these funds arise as a result of the "guaranteed" pensions they are supposed to provide to members upon retirement.

In the early 2000s, the entire structure of the defined-benefit scheme was criticized as being faulty. The liabilities that sponsoring companies and plan members must pay for has increased substantially, which has caused some pension plans to reduce benefits to retired members, or even to shut down entirely.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Defined-Contribution Plan

    A retirement plan in which a certain amount or percentage of ...
  2. Pension Plan

    A type of retirement plan, usually tax exempt, wherein an employer ...
  3. Pension Shortfall

    A situation in which a company offering employees a defined benefit ...
  4. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  5. Plan Participant

    A plan participant either contributes into a pension plan or ...
  6. Defined-Benefit Plan

    An employer-sponsored retirement plan where employee benefits ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Who bears the investment risk in 401(k) plans?

    Who actually bears the investment risk in a pension plan depends on the type of pension plan that is employed. In a broad ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the theory of asymmetric information in economics?

    The theory of asymmetric information was developed in the 1970s and 1980s as a plausible explanation for common phenomena ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does market risk differ from specific risk?

    Market risk and specific risk are two different forms of risk that affect assets. All investment assets can be separated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is perpetuity used in the Dividend Discount Model?

    The basic dividend discount model (DDM) creates an estimate of the constant growth rate, in perpetuity, expected for dividends ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How valid is the notion of economies of scope?

    The concept of economies of scope is widely accepted in both managerial and theoretical economics. It proposes that it is ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Should I purchase a master limited partnership (MLP) in my retirement account?

    Most investors should not purchase units in a master limited partnership, or MLP, in their retirement accounts. MLPs offer ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    The Investing Risk Of Underfunded Pension Plans

    Determine the risk to a company's EPS and financial condition resulting from an underfunded pension plan.
  2. Retirement

    Introduction To Social Security

    You've probably contributed to this fund, but will you reap the benefits? Find out here.
  3. Budgeting

    The Demise Of The Defined-Benefit Plan

    Experts are making bleak predictions for your post-work years. Be prepared and plan for your future.
  4. Taxes

    The 401(k) and Qualified Plans Tutorial

    Learn about eligibility requirements, contribution to and distribution rules for these retirement plans.
  5. Economics

    What Is Supply?

    Supply is the amount of goods a producer is willing to produce at a given price, and is one of the most basic concepts in economics.
  6. Economics

    Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR)

    Modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a variant of the more traditional internal rate of return calculation.
  7. Personal Finance

    Should You Track The Cost Of Retirement Income?

    Today, workers face a challenge when saving for retirement, because retirement income is getting more expensive, and the savings are not keeping up.
  8. Personal Finance

    A Guide to Financial Education for Doctors

    Doctors need to choose the educational option which best fits his or her time, schedule and learning preference. Here's a guide.
  9. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Geometric Mean

    The average of a set of products, the calculation of which is commonly used to determine the performance results of an investment or portfolio.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center