Leadership Grid

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DEFINITION of 'Leadership Grid'

A model of behavioral leadership developed in the 1950s by Robert Blake and Jane Mouton. Previously known as the Managerial Grid, it is based on two behavioral dimensions - concern for production, plotted on the X-axis on a scale from one to nine points; and concern for people, plotted on a similar scale along the Y-axis.


The model identified five leadership styles by their relative positions on the grid:


Impoverished (concern for production = 1, concern for people = 1)
Produce or Perish (9,1)
Middle of the Road (5,5)
Country Club (1, 9)
Team (9, 9)




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Leadership Grid'

The Leadership Grid demonstrates that placing undue emphasis on one area, while overlooking the other, stifles productivity. The model proposes that the team leadership style, which displays a high degree of concern for both production and people, may boost employee productivity.

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