Leakage

What is a 'Leakage'

A situation in which capital, or income, exits an economy, or system, rather than remains within it. In economics, leakage refers to outflow from a circular flow of income model. In a two sector model, all individual income is sent back to employers when goods and services are purchased, and back to employees through wages and dividends. Leakage occurs when income is taken out through taxes, savings and imports. In retail, leakage refers to consumers who spend money outside of the local market.



Leakage may also refer to the release of private information prior to it being released to the public.

BREAKING DOWN 'Leakage'

The exit of money from the economy through leakage results in a gap between what is supplied and what is demanded. If consumers spend their income outside of their community or country, then businesses must look elsewhere to make up for the loss of funds. In Keynesian economics, governments may have to inject cash into the system if leakage causes a shortage of capital.

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