Leaseback

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DEFINITION of 'Leaseback'

An arrangement where the seller of an asset leases back the same asset from the purchaser. In a leaseback arrangement, the specifics of the arrangement are made immediately after the sale of the asset, with the amount of the payments and the time period specified. Essentially, the seller of the asset becomes the lessee and the purchaser becomes the lessor in this arrangement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Leaseback'

A leaseback arrangement is useful when companies need to un-tie the cash invested in an asset for other investments, but the asset is still needed in order to operate. Leaseback deals can also provide the seller with additional tax deductions. The lessor benefits in that they will receive stable payments for a specified period of time.


Also known as a "sale and leaseback."

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