DEFINITION of 'Leaseback'

An arrangement where the seller of an asset leases back the same asset from the purchaser. In a leaseback arrangement, the specifics of the arrangement are made immediately after the sale of the asset, with the amount of the payments and the time period specified. Essentially, the seller of the asset becomes the lessee and the purchaser becomes the lessor in this arrangement.


A leaseback arrangement is useful when companies need to un-tie the cash invested in an asset for other investments, but the asset is still needed in order to operate. Leaseback deals can also provide the seller with additional tax deductions. The lessor benefits in that they will receive stable payments for a specified period of time.

Also known as a "sale and leaseback."

  1. True Lease

    A specific type of multi-year lease which does not pass on ownership ...
  2. Leveraged Lease

    A lease agreement that is partially financed by the lessor through ...
  3. Graduated Lease

    A type of long-term, typically for commercial property, lease ...
  4. Lease

    A legal document outlining the terms under which one party agrees ...
  5. Lessor

    The owner of an asset that is leased under an agreement to the ...
  6. Lessee

    The person who rents land or property from a lessor. The lessee ...
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