Legacy Asset

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DEFINITION of 'Legacy Asset'

An asset that has been on the company's books for a long period of time. This type of asset has generally decreased in value to the point of a loss for the company. The term comes from the literal meaning of outdate or obsolete.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Legacy Asset'

While these assets are generally considered a hinderance, it may be a good time to take another look at them in times of economic downturn. It is possible that they may have new value in a different time or economy. Conversely, it may also be a good time to sell the assets at a reduced price, simply to earn enough money to remain afloat during a recession.

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