Legislative Overkill

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DEFINITION of 'Legislative Overkill'

A law enacted to stop or prevent the abuse of a loophole, but ends up imposing more restrictions than are necessary for reasonable prevention.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Legislative Overkill'

In the context of the market, many people believe that investor education and further transparency do much more for the market than stricter legislation.

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