Lemon

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DEFINITION of 'Lemon'

A very disappointing investment. A lemon is an investment in which your expected return wasn't even close to being achieved, and more than likely ended up losing you some or all of the capital committed. Lemon investments can be associated with poor money management, economic factors, financial fraud or just plain bad luck.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Lemon'

The most common and well-known example of a lemon is in the used car industry, where defective or poorly conditioned vehicles that are bought and sold by the purchaser without prior knowledge of the true state of the vehicle. There are, however, regulations in the U.S. that attempt to protect consumers in the event that they purchase a defective vehicle, known as Lemon Laws.

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