Leprechaun Leader

DEFINITION of 'Leprechaun Leader'

A corporate manager or an executive who, like the fabled Irish elf, is a mischievous and elusive creature said to possess buried treasures of money and gold.

Also spelled "Lepre-con Leader".

BREAKING DOWN 'Leprechaun Leader'

According to Irish folklore, the location of hidden treasure is revealed only when the leprechaun is caught. In the case of a leprechaun leader, the "buried treasure" is not usually buried, but protected in an offshore account!

Examples of leprechaun leaders are the executives of Enron, who stowed away millions of dollars until they were finally caught.

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