Leverage Build Up

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DEFINITION of 'Leverage Build Up'

The accumulation of additional debt to enter a position that has the potential for large returns. From the perspective of portfolio management, leverage build up involves partaking in excessive leveraged positions for the opportunity to magnify returns. Leverage build up also occurs in corporate takeovers where a highly leveraged company purchases another leveraged company. Thus, the total debt of the parent increases.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Leverage Build Up'

Leverage build up, whether referring to portfolio management or corporate finance, increases the risk exposure of the investment. If the position does not come to fruition, the debt must still be repaid in a timely manner in order to avoid bankruptcy.

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