Leveraged Loan Index - LLI

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Leveraged Loan Index - LLI'

A market-weighted index that tracks the performance of institutional leveraged loans. By monitoring spreads and interest payments, the index can be a useful tool in gauging the health of the institutional loan markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS'Leveraged Loan Index - LLI'

The most popular leveraged loan index was developed by Standard & Poor's and the Loan Syndications and Trading Association. This version of the leveraged loan index is a common benchmark and represents the majority of the institutional loan universe. It originated in 1997.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Index

    A statistical measure of change in an economy or a securities ...
  2. Loan Syndication

    The process of involving several different lenders in providing ...
  3. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  4. Weighted Average Market Capitalization

    A stock market index weighted by the market capitalization of ...
  5. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  6. Standard & Poor's - S&P

    The world's leading index provider and the foremost source of ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Profit From Mortgage Debt With MBS

    Mortgage-backed securities can offer monthly income, a fixed interest rate and even government backing.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Benchmark Your Returns With Indexes

    If your portfolio is always falling short, you may not be making an apples-to-apples comparison.
  3. Economics

    The ABCs Of Stock Indexes

    Indexes can track market trends, but they're not always reliable. Can you trust them?
  4. Options & Futures

    Different Needs, Different Loans

    Find out what options are available when it comes to borrowing money.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  6. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  7. Investing Basics

    Understanding Buy Stop Orders

    A buy stop order is an order to buy a stock at a specific price above its current market price.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Bond Ratings

    A bond rating is a grade given to a bond to indicate its creditworthiness.
  9. Economics

    What are Barriers to Entry?

    A barrier to entry is any obstacle that restricts or impedes a company’s efforts to enter an industry.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the stock market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The stock market reacts to changes in the federal funds rate in various ways depending on where it is in the business cycle. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the requirements for being a Public Limited Company?

    The requirements for an entity to be considered a public limited company (PLC) include registration requirements, establishing ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I place an order to buy or sell shares?

    It is easy to get started buying and selling stocks, especially with the advancements in online trading since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between the return on total assets and an interest rate?

    Return on total assets (ROTA) represents one of the profitability metrics. It is calculated by taking a company's earnings ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the holding period on a stock dividend start?

    The holding period on a stock dividend typically begins the day after it is purchased. Understanding the holding period is ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or seminar to market new products or services to potential buyers.
  2. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  3. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  4. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  5. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  6. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!