Leveraged Loan Index - LLI

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DEFINITION of 'Leveraged Loan Index - LLI'

A market-weighted index that tracks the performance of institutional leveraged loans. By monitoring spreads and interest payments, the index can be a useful tool in gauging the health of the institutional loan markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Leveraged Loan Index - LLI'

The most popular leveraged loan index was developed by Standard & Poor's and the Loan Syndications and Trading Association. This version of the leveraged loan index is a common benchmark and represents the majority of the institutional loan universe. It originated in 1997.

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