Leveraged Lease

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DEFINITION of 'Leveraged Lease'

A lease agreement that is partially financed by the lessor through a third-party financial institution. In a leveraged lease, the lending company holds the title to the leased asset, while the lessor creates the agreement with the lessee and collects the payment. The payments are then passed on to the lender.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Leveraged Lease'

In a leveraged lease, if the lessee stops making payments to the lessor, then the lessor stops making payments to the financial institution (lender). This allows the lender to repossess the property. The lessor may also have the right to retain the property upon lessee default, as long as the lessor continues making payments to the lender.

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