Liability Adjusted Cash Flow Yield - LACFY

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DEFINITION of 'Liability Adjusted Cash Flow Yield - LACFY'

A fundamental analysis calculation that compares a company's long-term free cash flow to its outstanding liabilities over the same period. Liability adjusted cash flow yield can be used to determine how long it will take for a buyout to become profitable or how a company is valued. It is calculated as:


Average Free Cash Flow
[(Outstanding Shares + Options + Warrants) x (Per Share Price) - Liabilities] - [Current Assets - Inventory]

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Liability Adjusted Cash Flow Yield - LACFY'

Liability adjusted cash flow yield is not commonly used in company valuation. To see whether an investment is worthwhile, an analyst may look at ten years worth of data in a LACFY calculation and compare that to the yield on a 10 year Treasury note. The smaller the difference between LACFY and the Treasury yield, the less desirable an investment is.

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