Liability Ledger

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DEFINITION of 'Liability Ledger'

The central file that contains a comprehensive list of all of a bank's loans and borrower discounts. This ledger can be subordinate to a bank's general ledger accounting system that is stored on computer. The liability ledger is stored in the bank's loan department.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Liability Ledger'

The sum total of all of the loans on a bank's liability ledger constitute the majority of a bank's earning assets. If the liability ledger is not computerized, then it is stored on individual ledger cards for each customer. However, this practice has become largely obsolete.

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