Liability Management


DEFINITION of 'Liability Management'

Use and management of liabilities, such as customer deposits, by a bank in order to facilitate lending and allow for balanced growth. Management of money accepted from depositors as well as funds secured from other institutions constitute liability management. It also involves hedging against changes in interest rates and controlling the gap between the maturities of assets and liabilities.

BREAKING DOWN 'Liability Management'

Banks began to actively manage liabilities in the 1960s with the issuance of negotiable CDs. These could be sold in the secondary market, prior to maturity in order to raise additional capital in the money market. Liability management constitutes an important part of a bank's bottom line.

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