Liability Management

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Liability Management'

Use and management of liabilities, such as customer deposits, by a bank in order to facilitate lending and allow for balanced growth. Management of money accepted from depositors as well as funds secured from other institutions constitute liability management. It also involves hedging against changes in interest rates and controlling the gap between the maturities of assets and liabilities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Liability Management'

Banks began to actively manage liabilities in the 1960s with the issuance of negotiable CDs. These could be sold in the secondary market, prior to maturity in order to raise additional capital in the money market. Liability management constitutes an important part of a bank's bottom line.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Liability Ledger

    The central file that contains a comprehensive list of all of ...
  2. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  3. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  4. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
  5. Remote Deposit Capture

    A technology-based method that lets banks accept checks for deposit ...
  6. Bankers Professional Liability ...

    Financial protection for financial professionals against customers’ ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is reconciliation treated under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)?

    The generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, provide different reconciliation rules for balancing many kinds of ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Where did the concept of reconciliation in accounting come from?

    Financial accountants perform reconciliation to ensure that the balances of two accounts are in agreement. The process by ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are all fixed costs considered sunk costs?

    In accounting, finance and economics, all sunk costs are fixed costs. However, not all fixed costs are considered to be sunk. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between work in progress (WIP) and raw materials in accounting?

    Raw materials and works in progress (WIP) are distinct categories in financial accounting for business inventory. Each applies ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is accounting in the United States different from international accounting?

    Despite major efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the variance/covariance matrix or parametric method in Value at Risk (VaR)?

    The parametric method, also known as the variance-covariance method, is a risk management technique for calculating the value ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Reading The Balance Sheet

    Learn about the components of the statement of financial position and how they relate to each other.
  2. Personal Finance

    Breaking Down The Balance Sheet

    Knowing what the company's financial statements mean will help you to analyze your investments.
  3. Forex Education

    Using The Price-To-Book Ratio To Evaluate Companies

    The P/B ratio can be an easy way to determine a company's value, but it isn't magic!
  4. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  5. Markets

    Introduction To Fundamental Analysis

    Learn this easy-to-understand technique of analyzing a company's financial statements and reports.
  6. Options & Futures

    Advanced Financial Statement Analysis

    Learn what it means to do your homework on a company's performance and reporting practices before investing.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  8. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  10. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Wash Trading

    The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading ...
  2. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  3. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  4. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  5. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  6. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
Trading Center