DEFINITION of 'London Interbank Bid Rate - LIBID'

The average interest rate which major London banks borrow Eurocurrency deposits from other banks. LIBID is calculated through a survey of London banks to determine the interest rate which they are willing to borrow large eurocurrency deposits.

BREAKING DOWN 'London Interbank Bid Rate - LIBID'

Unlike LIBOR, which is determined by the average interest rate which banks are willing to lend eurocurrency deposits, LIBID refers to the rate which banks bid to borrow.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between LIBID and LIBOR?

    Both LIBID and LIBOR are rates primarily used by banks in the London interbank market. The London interbank market is a wholesale ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between LIBOR, LIBID and LIMEAN?

    LIBOR, LIBID and LIMEAN are all reference rates used to benchmark short-term interest rates. The London Interbank Offered ... Read Answer >>
  3. For what types of accounts are demand deposits available?

    Learn about the different types of accounts designated as demand deposit accounts, such as savings accounts and money market ... Read Answer >>
  4. What are the Federal Reserve's guidelines on demand deposit accounts?

    Read about some of the Federal Reserve's requirements and guidelines regarding the treatment, safeguarding and processing ... Read Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between the prime rate and the discount rate?

    Learn more about the prime rate and the discount rate and how the Federal Reserve uses these rates in the U.S. economy. Explore ... Read Answer >>
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    Learn how central banks such as the Federal Reserve influence monetary policy in the economy by increasing or decreasing ... Read Answer >>
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